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Nightly Sleep of Five Hours or Less May Increase Risk of Dementia, Death Among Older Adults

Nightly Sleep of Five Hours or Less May Increase Risk of Dementia, Death Among Older Adults

Survey finds very short sleep duration in this population was associated with double the risk of dementia

New research from investigators at Brigham and Women’s Hospital explores the connection between sleep disturbances and deficiencies among older adults and risk of dementia and death, finding that risk of dementia was double among participants who reported getting less than five hours of sleep compared to those who reported 7-8 hours . . . The team also found associations . . .

Increased Meat Consumption Associated with Symptoms of Childhood Asthma, Mount Sinai Study Suggests

Increased Meat Consumption Associated with Symptoms of Childhood Asthma, Mount Sinai Study Suggests

Substances present in cooked meats are associated with increased wheezing in children, Mount Sinai researchers report. Their study, published in Thorax, highlights pro-inflammatory compounds called advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) as an example of early dietary risk factors that may have broad clinical and public health implications for the prevention of inflammatory airway disease.

Asthma prevalence among children in the United States has risen . . .

Free Radicals: What You Need to Know

Free Radicals: What You Need to Know

Your body does so much to keep you safe and healthy behind the scenes! For example, it is constantly fighting a battle against harmful oxidizing particles called free radicals.

Free radicals can come from our food, medications, the air we breath, or the water we drink. Free radicals are sometimes byproducts of chemical processes such as genetic modification or come from the packaging of the products we use. They can even come from natural processes such as when our bodies break down the food we eat.

These microscopic menaces . . .

5 Self Care Practices to Manage Stress

5 Self Care Practices to Manage Stress

It’s easy with a demanding schedule and so many responsibilities to forget to take care of yourself – both physically and emotionally. Self-care is often the last thing we prioritize, but it is one of the most important aspects of good stress management. . . .

[P]racticing the discipline of self-care will help protect your health and skin for years to come!

Relationship Between Stress & Skin

The relationship between stress and skin is real! For example, [M]any skin conditions, such as acne, eczema, rosacea, psoriasis . . .

Gut Inflammation: 12 Causes (and 12 Effects)

Gut Inflammation: 12 Causes (and 12 Effects)

New research emerges every day revealing the connections between the gut and overall health.

Gut health is influenced by two related variables: the intestinal barrier and the gut microbiota. Disturbances in either one of these factors can induce gut inflammation, inciting a chain reaction of damage that begins locally and may spread systemically throughout the body.

The intestinal barrier is a multilayer system made up of intestinal epithelial cells, proteins, protective mucus . . .

Make-up of Gut Microbiome May Influence COVID-19 Severity and Immune Response

Make-up of Gut Microbiome May Influence COVID-19 Severity and Immune Response

Imbalances in type and volume of bacteria may also be implicated in ‘long COVID’

The variety and volume of bacteria in the gut, known as the microbiome, may influence the severity of COVID-19 as well as the magnitude of the immune system response to the infection, suggests research published online in the journal Gut.

Imbalances in the make-up of the microbiome may also be implicated in persisting inflammatory symptoms, dubbed ‘long COVID’, the findings suggest.

4 Ways to Improve Uterine Fibroid Symptoms without Surgery

4 Ways to Improve Uterine Fibroid Symptoms without Surgery

If you’re struggling with abdominal pain, heavy, painful periods, and fatigue, you might be one of the millions of women diagnosed with uterine fibroids each year. The most common neoplasm affecting women (non-cancerous growths, also called leiomyomas) occur in 70 percent of pre-menopausal women. . . . Conventional treatment typically involves hormonal birth control, medication, or surgery—but doesn’t address the root of the issue. Following a myomectomy (surgical removal), up to a third of fibroids recur . . .

Processed Meat Linked to Cardiovascular Disease and Death

Processed Meat Linked to Cardiovascular Disease and Death

A global study led by Hamilton scientists has found a link between eating processed meat and a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. The same study did not find the same link with unprocessed red meat or poultry.

The information comes from the diets and health outcomes of 134,297 people from 21 countries spanning five continents, who were tracked by researchers for data on meat consumption and cardiovascular illnesses.

Breast Cancer: The Risks of Brominated Flame Retardants

Breast Cancer: The Risks of Brominated Flame Retardants

Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are found in furniture, electronics, and kitchenware to slow the spread of flames in the event of a fire. However, it has been shown that these molecules may lead to early mammary gland development.

Part of the flame retardants are considered to be endocrine disruptors, i.e. they interfere with the hormonal system. Since they are not directly bound to the material in which they are added, the molecules escape easily. They are then found in house dust, air . . .

Why Asian Americans Don’t Seek Help for Mental Illness

Why Asian Americans Don’t Seek Help for Mental Illness

Mental health stigma affects all ethnicities, cultures, and nationalities, but Asian Americans may be more impacted than most. The National Latino and Asian American Study reported that while 18% of the general U.S. population sought mental health services and resources, only 8.6% of Asian Americans did so. A related study found that white U.S. citizens take advantage of mental health services at three times the rate of Asian Americans.

So, why don’t most Asian Americans seek help for mental illness?

Common Chemicals Found in Supplements: What Are Their Health Effects?

Common Chemicals Found in Supplements: What Are Their Health Effects?

Magnesium stearate, silicon dioxide, and titanium dioxide are three widely used supplement additives that function as binders, fillers, and preservatives. While regulatory health authorities like the FDA approve these substances for commercial use, research studies indicate that serious health consequences could manifest if consumers regularly ingest these chemicals.

Lauren Fang

Chronic Viral Infections Can Have Lasting Effects on Human Immunity, Similar to Aging

Chronic Viral Infections Can Have Lasting Effects on Human Immunity, Similar to Aging

Research from the Buck Institute and Stanford University suggests that chronic viral infections have a profound and lasting impact on the human immune system in ways that are similar to those seen during aging. Results are published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Using systems immunology and artificial intelligence, researchers profiled and compared immune responses in a cohort of aging individuals . . .

Understanding the Link between Autism and the Microbiome

Understanding the Link between Autism and the Microbiome

When you think of ways to support a baby’s developing brain, what comes to mind? My guess is that bacteria is likely not something that initially pops into your head.

But more and more research is finding that the bacteria and microorganisms that make up the gut microbiome may actually have a monumental impact on exactly how the brain develops and functions. This is particularly true in the case of a specific set of neurodevelopment disorders known as autism spectrum disorders.

Why Indoor Spaces Are Still Prime COVID Hotspots

Why Indoor Spaces Are Still Prime COVID Hotspots

Risks shoot up when virus particles accumulate in buildings, but it’s not clear how best to improve ventilation.

When Lidia Morawska leaves home, she takes with her a slick, shoe-sized device . . . [H]er carbon dioxide monitor reads just above 400 parts per million (p.p.m.) [while outside].

Even in a seemingly spacious, high-ceilinged restaurant, the number sometimes shoots up as high as 2,000 p.p.m. — a sign that the room has poor ventilation and could pose a risk for COVID-19 infection.

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Dr. Jason Fung: How to Reverse Fatty Liver Disease Naturally

Author Arlene Pellicane: 5 Skills Your Child Needs When Spending Time on Screens

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Increased Meat Consumption Associated with Symptoms of Childhood Asthma, Mount Sinai Study Suggests

Increased Meat Consumption Associated with Symptoms of Childhood Asthma, Mount Sinai Study Suggests

Substances present in cooked meats are associated with increased wheezing in children, Mount Sinai researchers report. Their study, published in Thorax, highlights pro-inflammatory compounds called advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) as an example of early dietary risk factors that may have broad clinical and public health implications for the prevention of inflammatory airway disease.

Asthma prevalence among children in the United States has risen . . .

4 Ways to Improve Uterine Fibroid Symptoms without Surgery

4 Ways to Improve Uterine Fibroid Symptoms without Surgery

If you’re struggling with abdominal pain, heavy, painful periods, and fatigue, you might be one of the millions of women diagnosed with uterine fibroids each year. The most common neoplasm affecting women (non-cancerous growths, also called leiomyomas) occur in 70 percent of pre-menopausal women. . . . Conventional treatment typically involves hormonal birth control, medication, or surgery—but doesn’t address the root of the issue. Following a myomectomy (surgical removal), up to a third of fibroids recur . . .

Breast Cancer: The Risks of Brominated Flame Retardants

Breast Cancer: The Risks of Brominated Flame Retardants

Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are found in furniture, electronics, and kitchenware to slow the spread of flames in the event of a fire. However, it has been shown that these molecules may lead to early mammary gland development.

Part of the flame retardants are considered to be endocrine disruptors, i.e. they interfere with the hormonal system. Since they are not directly bound to the material in which they are added, the molecules escape easily. They are then found in house dust, air . . .

Free Radicals: What You Need to Know

Free Radicals: What You Need to Know

Your body does so much to keep you safe and healthy behind the scenes! For example, it is constantly fighting a battle against harmful oxidizing particles called free radicals.

Free radicals can come from our food, medications, the air we breath, or the water we drink. Free radicals are sometimes byproducts of chemical processes such as genetic modification or come from the packaging of the products we use. They can even come from natural processes such as when our bodies break down the food we eat.

These microscopic menaces . . .

Nightly Sleep of Five Hours or Less May Increase Risk of Dementia, Death Among Older Adults

Nightly Sleep of Five Hours or Less May Increase Risk of Dementia, Death Among Older Adults

Survey finds very short sleep duration in this population was associated with double the risk of dementia

New research from investigators at Brigham and Women’s Hospital explores the connection between sleep disturbances and deficiencies among older adults and risk of dementia and death, finding that risk of dementia was double among participants who reported getting less than five hours of sleep compared to those who reported 7-8 hours . . . The team also found associations . . .

Gut Inflammation: 12 Causes (and 12 Effects)

Gut Inflammation: 12 Causes (and 12 Effects)

New research emerges every day revealing the connections between the gut and overall health.

Gut health is influenced by two related variables: the intestinal barrier and the gut microbiota. Disturbances in either one of these factors can induce gut inflammation, inciting a chain reaction of damage that begins locally and may spread systemically throughout the body.

The intestinal barrier is a multilayer system made up of intestinal epithelial cells, proteins, protective mucus . . .

Make-up of Gut Microbiome May Influence COVID-19 Severity and Immune Response

Make-up of Gut Microbiome May Influence COVID-19 Severity and Immune Response

Imbalances in type and volume of bacteria may also be implicated in ‘long COVID’

The variety and volume of bacteria in the gut, known as the microbiome, may influence the severity of COVID-19 as well as the magnitude of the immune system response to the infection, suggests research published online in the journal Gut

Imbalances in the make-up of the microbiome may also be implicated in persisting inflammatory symptoms, dubbed ‘long COVID’, the findings suggest. 

Common Chemicals Found in Supplements: What Are Their Health Effects?

Common Chemicals Found in Supplements: What Are Their Health Effects?

Magnesium stearate, silicon dioxide, and titanium dioxide are three widely used supplement additives that function as binders, fillers, and preservatives. While regulatory health authorities like the FDA approve these substances for commercial use, research studies indicate that serious health consequences could manifest if consumers regularly ingest these chemicals.

Lauren Fang

Chronic Viral Infections Can Have Lasting Effects on Human Immunity, Similar to Aging

Chronic Viral Infections Can Have Lasting Effects on Human Immunity, Similar to Aging

Research from the Buck Institute and Stanford University suggests that chronic viral infections have a profound and lasting impact on the human immune system in ways that are similar to those seen during aging. Results are published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Using systems immunology and artificial intelligence, researchers profiled and compared immune responses in a cohort of aging individuals . . .

Processed Meat Linked to Cardiovascular Disease and Death

Processed Meat Linked to Cardiovascular Disease and Death

A global study led by Hamilton scientists has found a link between eating processed meat and a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. The same study did not find the same link with unprocessed red meat or poultry.

The information comes from the diets and health outcomes of 134,297 people from 21 countries spanning five continents, who were tracked by researchers for data on meat consumption and cardiovascular illnesses.

5 Self Care Practices to Manage Stress

5 Self Care Practices to Manage Stress

It’s easy with a demanding schedule and so many responsibilities to forget to take care of yourself – both physically and emotionally. Self-care is often the last thing we prioritize, but it is one of the most important aspects of good stress management. . . .

[P]racticing the discipline of self-care will help protect your health and skin for years to come!

Relationship Between Stress & Skin

The relationship between stress and skin is real! For example, [M]any skin conditions, such as acne, eczema, rosacea, psoriasis . . .

Why Asian Americans Don’t Seek Help for Mental Illness

Why Asian Americans Don’t Seek Help for Mental Illness

Mental health stigma affects all ethnicities, cultures, and nationalities, but Asian Americans may be more impacted than most. The National Latino and Asian American Study reported that while 18% of the general U.S. population sought mental health services and resources, only 8.6% of Asian Americans did so. A related study found that white U.S. citizens take advantage of mental health services at three times the rate of Asian Americans.

So, why don’t most Asian Americans seek help for mental illness?

Understanding the Link between Autism and the Microbiome

Understanding the Link between Autism and the Microbiome

When you think of ways to support a baby’s developing brain, what comes to mind? My guess is that bacteria is likely not something that initially pops into your head.

But more and more research is finding that the bacteria and microorganisms that make up the gut microbiome may actually have a monumental impact on exactly how the brain develops and functions. This is particularly true in the case of a specific set of neurodevelopment disorders known as autism spectrum disorders.

Why Indoor Spaces Are Still Prime COVID Hotspots

Why Indoor Spaces Are Still Prime COVID Hotspots

Risks shoot up when virus particles accumulate in buildings, but it’s not clear how best to improve ventilation.

When Lidia Morawska leaves home, she takes with her a slick, shoe-sized device . . . [H]er carbon dioxide monitor reads just above 400 parts per million (p.p.m.) [while outside].

Even in a seemingly spacious, high-ceilinged restaurant, the number sometimes shoots up as high as 2,000 p.p.m. — a sign that the room has poor ventilation and could pose a risk for COVID-19 infection.

Chronic Viral Infections Can Have Lasting Effects on Human Immunity, Similar to Aging

Chronic Viral Infections Can Have Lasting Effects on Human Immunity, Similar to Aging

Research from the Buck Institute and Stanford University suggests that chronic viral infections have a profound and lasting impact on the human immune system in ways that are similar to those seen during aging. Results are published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Using systems immunology and artificial intelligence, researchers profiled and compared immune responses in a cohort of aging individuals . . .

Editor's Picks

Leisure Physical Activity Is Linked with Health Benefits but Work Activity Is Not

Leisure Physical Activity Is Linked with Health Benefits but Work Activity Is Not

The first large study showing that leisure time physical activity and occupational physical activity have opposite, and independent, associations with cardiovascular disease risk and longevity is published . . . in European Heart Journal, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

“We adjusted for multiple factors in our analysis, indicating that the relationships were not explained by lifestyle, health conditions or socioeconomic status,” said study author . . .

Industrial Animal Agriculture Poses Serious Threats to Human Health

Industrial Animal Agriculture Poses Serious Threats to Human Health

For people who live near industrial animal feedlots, the stench, flies and day-and-night rumbling of trucks are more than a nuisance that impairs the use and enjoyment of their own property. Concentrated animal feeding operations, or CAFOs – whether swine, cattle or poultry – also pose serious health threats. . . .

[A 2018 study] found that . . . North Carolina communities located near hog CAFOs had higher total and infant deaths, deaths due to anemia, kidney disease, tuberculosis, septicemia . . .

How to Exercise Your Brain for Better Focus + Productivity

How to Exercise Your Brain for Better Focus + Productivity

Many of us spend a good amount of time thinking about our physical fitness.

But what about our mental fitness?

Sometimes in our quest for a healthy, vibrant body, we can forget that our minds are a critical piece of the puzzle of our health. Our brain is an incredibly complex organ and is responsible for movements, mood, and thoughts.

So, if we hit the gym to work out our quads and biceps, why can’t we also work out our brains as well? Well, we can — and we should! Here are five ways . . .

Heart Rate Variability: What It Is and Why It’s Important

Heart Rate Variability: What It Is and Why It’s Important

[Y]our heart does not beat like an unchanging metronome, i.e., the intervals vary between one heartbeat and the next. Heart Rate Variability (HRV) is the beat-to-beat variation in consecutive heartbeats as shown in electrocardiogram (EKG).

. . . HRV is a quick and reliable view into the state of your physical — and even mental — health. . . .HRV can also indicate deteriorating health.

H. pylori: What It Is + 9 Natural Treatments

H. pylori: What It Is + 9 Natural Treatments

Do you know what’s been called “the most successful pathogen in human history?” It’s a type of bacteria known as Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and it’s been around for at least two hundred thousand years. 

According to the CDC, about 66 percent of the world’s human population is infected with Helicobacter pylori. . . . But, having this bacteria living in your body can make your risk of developing gastric cancer up to six times higher. Plus, H. pylori bacteria is often at the root of other major digestive problems . . . 

Nutrition Can Strengthen the Immune System to Fight COVID-19

Nutrition Can Strengthen the Immune System to Fight COVID-19

Dietary changes can help bolster your natural immunity against viruses.

No diet can reduce your risk of catching COVID-19. . . . [I]t is largely the health of your immune system that ultimately determines your fate.

Yet even with a grand total of zero dietary studies available thus far, it would be a mistake to conclude that diet doesn’t matter in a pandemic. . . . [This is] because the majority of people who suffer serious consequences from COVID infections have something in common: poor metabolic health.

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Alcohol and Your Heart

Alcohol and Your Heart

[T]he latest research suggests . . . [that moderate] alcohol consumption [one drink for women and two for men per day] is linked with an increased risk of accidents, falls, several types of cancer, and numerous cardiovascular problems.

Cruciferous Vegetables and Thyroid Disease

Cruciferous Vegetables and Thyroid Disease

The thyroid gland produces hormones that control metabolism as well as influence other essential systems in the human body, such as the cardiovascular system, the immune system, and calcium homeostasis. Thyroid hormones increase . . .

Ketogenic Diet Proves Effective in Alzheimer’s Disease

Ketogenic Diet Proves Effective in Alzheimer’s Disease

The brain’s primary fuel is glucose.

Recently, technology has evolved to allow researchers the ability to visualize, using PET scans, how the brain is able to utilize another fuel, ketone bodies.

Study Suggests High Vitamin D Levels May Protect Against COVID-19, Especially for Black People

Study Suggests High Vitamin D Levels May Protect Against COVID-19, Especially for Black People

A new research study . . . has found that when it comes to COVID-19, having vitamin D levels above those traditionally considered sufficient may lower the risk of infection . . .

Non-Invasive Skin Swab Samples Are Enough to Quickly Detect COVID-19, a New Study Finds

Non-Invasive Skin Swab Samples Are Enough to Quickly Detect COVID-19, a New Study Finds

Researchers at the University of Surrey have found that non-invasive skin swab samples may be enough to detect COVID-19.

In a paper published by Lancet E Clinical Medicine, chemists from Surrey . . .

Study Claims to Shut the Coffin Lid on Supplements for COVID-19

Study Claims to Shut the Coffin Lid on Supplements for COVID-19

While vaccines are hailed . . . is it balanced and equitable for supplements to be relegated to the trash heap?

[T]here’s a considerable body of scientific literature that show they [supplements] boost immune defenses.

THC Stays in Breast Milk for Six Weeks, Study Shows

THC Stays in Breast Milk for Six Weeks, Study Shows

In a new study, researchers found that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana, stays in breast milk for up to six weeks. The finding supports recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics . . .

Your Guide to Eye Health

Your Guide to Eye Health

Scientists have known for many years that neurogenesis, the growth of new nerve cells, occurs in the brain. However, emerging research indicates that the eyes, which are really an extension of the brain, also have cells capable of regeneration.

How to Help a Loved One Struggling with Suicidal Thoughts

How to Help a Loved One Struggling with Suicidal Thoughts

Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, with almost 45,000 victims every year. Approximately 123 Americans die from suicide each day, but many more attempt suicide . . .

6 Common Drugs Your Body Needs to Try to Cut Ties With

6 Common Drugs Your Body Needs to Try to Cut Ties With

[W]e are a nation of [drug] over-users. . . . Drugs, be they prescription or over-the-counter, unbalance the system by design. They inhibit certain natural physiological processes . . .

Why Practicing Gratitude Is Good for Your Health

Why Practicing Gratitude Is Good for Your Health

[S]cience shows what the ancients knew intuitively—that grateful people are likely to be much happier and healthier than their pessimistic counterparts. For example, expressing gratitude enhances . . .

Green Leafy Vegetables Essential for Muscle Strength

Green Leafy Vegetables Essential for Muscle Strength

Eating just one cup of leafy green vegetables every day could boost muscle function, according to new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research.

The study . . . found that people who consumed a nitrate-rich diet . . .

High-Intensity Exercise May Restore Heart Function in People with Type 2 Diabetes

High-Intensity Exercise May Restore Heart Function in People with Type 2 Diabetes

[A University of Otago] study found that three months of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) improved heart function in adults with type 2 diabetes, without any change in medications or diet.

Self-Care Rx: Movement

Self-Care Rx: Movement

Exercise offers a plethora of health benefits – it strengthens muscles and bones, improves sleep and mood, boosts the immune system, supports memory and cognition . . .

And when you exercise throughout your life, studies show it can slow signs of aging.

Higher Aerobic Fitness Levels Are Associated with Better Word Production Skills in Healthy Older Adults

Higher Aerobic Fitness Levels Are Associated with Better Word Production Skills in Healthy Older Adults

Researchers found that older adults’ aerobic fitness levels are directly related to the incidence of age-related language failures such as ‘tip-of-the-tongue’ states.

Environmental Toxins and Cognitive Decline: 6 Steps to Reduce Your Risk

Environmental Toxins and Cognitive Decline: 6 Steps to Reduce Your Risk

Researchers have linked low-level toxin exposure to many diseases including cancer, cardiovascular, and kidney disease. [There is a] . . . growing body of medical literature that demonstrates that certain toxins . . .

Study Finds New Evidence of Health Threat from Chemicals in Marijuana and Tobacco Smoke

Study Finds New Evidence of Health Threat from Chemicals in Marijuana and Tobacco Smoke

In a [recent] study . . . researchers report[ed] that people who smoked only marijuana had several smoke-related toxic chemicals in their blood and urine . . . Two of those chemicals . . .

"Hidden-In-Plain-Sight" Toxin Raises Your Risk for Developing Diabetes by 65%

“Hidden-In-Plain-Sight” Toxin Raises Your Risk for Developing Diabetes by 65%

It’s one of the world’s most under acknowledged causes of illness. Elevated levels of it are linked to heart disease, impaired cognitive function, chronic fatigue syndrome, immune system dysfunction . . .

Prostate Enlargement

Prostate Enlargement

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is commonly referred to as prostate enlargement. . . .

As this gland enlarges it encroaches upon the urethra and interferes with urine flow. This causes the bladder to become irritated and as a result thickens. This irritation . . .

3 Simple Ways to Use Your Brain to Change Your Age

3 Simple Ways to Use Your Brain to Change Your Age

It’s clear that not everyone—or every brain—ages the same way. But by putting neuroscience into practice in our daily lives, there are a number of things we can all do to help preserve our mental abilities; prevent cognitive impairment . . .

Abdominal Fat Gain Tied to Heart Disease Risk in Menopause

Abdominal Fat Gain Tied to Heart Disease Risk in Menopause

Women who experience an accelerated accumulation of abdominal fat during menopause are at greater risk of heart disease, even if their weight stays steady, according to a University of Pittsburgh . . .

How Sleep Helps Teens Deal with Social Stress

How Sleep Helps Teens Deal with Social Stress

[A Michigan State University] study, which focused on ninth grade students, found that adequate sleep allowed students to cope with discrimination and challenges associated with ethnic or racial bias.

Asian Americans and the Model Minority Dilemma

Asian Americans and the Model Minority Dilemma

The March 16 shooting deaths of eight people in Atlanta, six of them Asian women, has left the Asian American and Pacific islands communities not only grieving and fearful—but also organizing to raise awareness around the bias they live with . . .

Social Support and a Purpose in Life May Help Preserve Cognitive Abilities with Age in Hispanics/Latinos

Social Support and a Purpose in Life May Help Preserve Cognitive Abilities with Age in Hispanics/Latinos

Higher social support and having a sense of purpose in life are each associated with higher cognitive functioning in middle-aged and older Hispanics/Latinos . . .