Fitness


Low Fitness Linked to Higher Depression and Anxiety Risk

Low Fitness Linked to Higher Depression and Anxiety Risk

People with low aerobic and muscular fitness are nearly twice as likely to experience depression, finds a new study led by UCL researchers.

Low fitness levels also predicted a 60% greater chance of anxiety, over a seven-year follow-up, according to the findings published in BMC Medicine.

Lead author, PhD student Aaron Kandola (UCL Psychiatry) said: “Here we have provided further evidence of a relationship between physical and mental health, and that structured exercise . . . 

Study: Preschoolers with Higher Cardiorespiratory Fitness Do Better on Cognitive Tests

Study: Preschoolers with Higher Cardiorespiratory Fitness Do Better on Cognitive Tests

Researchers report that 4-6-year-old children who walk farther than their peers during a timed test – a method used to estimate cardiorespiratory health – also do better on cognitive tests and other measures of brain function. Published in the Journal of Clinical Medicine, the study suggests that the link between cardiorespiratory fitness and cognitive health is evident even earlier in life than previously appreciated.

Instant Death from Heart Attack More Common in People Who Do Not Exercise

Instant Death from Heart Attack More Common in People Who Do Not Exercise

 An active lifestyle is linked with a lower chance of dying immediately from a heart attack, according to a study published . . . in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

Heart disease is the leading cause of death globally and prevention is a major public health priority. This study focused on the effect of an active versus sedentary lifestyle on the immediate course of a heart attack . . .

High-Intensity Exercise Delays Parkinson’s Progression

High-Intensity Exercise Delays Parkinson’s Progression

High-intensity exercise three times a week is safe for individuals with early-stage Parkinson’s disease and decreases worsening of motor symptoms, according to a new phase 2, multi-site trial led by Northwestern Medicine and University of Colorado School of Medicine scientists.

This is the first time scientists have tested the effects of high-intensity exercise on patients with Parkinson’s disease, the second most common neurodegenerative disorder and the most common movement disorder . . .

Exercise May Improve Thinking Skills in People as Young as 20

Exercise May Improve Thinking Skills in People as Young as 20

Regular aerobic exercise such as walking, cycling or climbing stairs may improve thinking skills not only in older people but in young people as well, according to a study published in the . . . online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that the positive effect of exercise on thinking skills may increase as people age. The specific set of thinking skills that improved with exercise is called executive function.

Working Out May Combat Inflammation in Newly-Discovered Ways

Working Out May Combat Inflammation in Newly-Discovered Ways

Exercising muscles may block interferon gamma (IFN-γ), an inflammatory cytokine.

First-of-its-kind research performed on lab-grown muscle tissue suggests that when human muscle cells are stimulated during exercise, it triggers a complex chain reaction that may combat chronic inflammation by blocking a pro-inflammatory cytokine called interferon gamma (IFN-γ).

Low Fitness Linked to Higher Psoriasis Risk Later in Life

Low Fitness Linked to Higher Psoriasis Risk Later in Life

In a major register-based study, scientists at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have now demonstrated a connection between inferior physical fitness in young adults and elevated risk of the autoimmune disease psoriasis. For the male recruits to compulsory military training who were rated as the least fit, the risk of developing psoriasis later was 35 per cent higher than for the fittest.

*See Publisher’s Note

Publisher’s Note Regarding Medication Usage: This article mentions current medical treatments for psoriasis. The Health Examiner does not support drug usage to alleviate psoriasis symptoms but rather encourages readers to investigate alternative therapies, such as exercise, and other lifestyle approaches and natural supplements to address the root causes of psoriasis.

*This Publisher’s Note is not medical advice. Please consult with your physician regarding any health concerns. Acting on any information provided on this site is done so at your own risk.

Strength Training May Reduce the Risk of Diabetes in Obesity

Strength Training May Reduce the Risk of Diabetes in Obesity

Strength training over a short time period can reduce fat stores in the liver and improve blood glucose control in obese mice, according to a study published in the Journal of Endocrinology. The study reports that strength training over a short time-period, less than would be enough to change body fat composition in humans, was sufficient to reduce the accumulation of liver fat and improve regulation of blood glucose . . . 

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Study: Preschoolers with Higher Cardiorespiratory Fitness Do Better on Cognitive Tests

Study: Preschoolers with Higher Cardiorespiratory Fitness Do Better on Cognitive Tests

Researchers report that 4-6-year-old children who walk farther than their peers during a timed test – a method used to estimate cardiorespiratory health – also do better on cognitive tests and other measures of brain function. Published in the Journal of Clinical Medicine, the study suggests that the link between cardiorespiratory fitness and cognitive health is evident even earlier in life than previously appreciated.

Instant Death from Heart Attack More Common in People Who Do Not Exercise

Instant Death from Heart Attack More Common in People Who Do Not Exercise

 An active lifestyle is linked with a lower chance of dying immediately from a heart attack, according to a study published . . . in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

Heart disease is the leading cause of death globally and prevention is a major public health priority. This study focused on the effect of an active versus sedentary lifestyle on the immediate course of a heart attack . . .

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Low Fitness Linked to Higher Depression and Anxiety Risk

Low Fitness Linked to Higher Depression and Anxiety Risk

People with low aerobic and muscular fitness are nearly twice as likely to experience depression, finds a new study led by UCL researchers.

Low fitness levels also predicted a 60% greater chance of anxiety, over a seven-year follow-up, according to the findings published in BMC Medicine.

Lead author, PhD student Aaron Kandola (UCL Psychiatry) said: “Here we have provided further evidence of a relationship between physical and mental health, and that structured exercise . . . 

High-Intensity Exercise Delays Parkinson’s Progression

High-Intensity Exercise Delays Parkinson’s Progression

High-intensity exercise three times a week is safe for individuals with early-stage Parkinson’s disease and decreases worsening of motor symptoms, according to a new phase 2, multi-site trial led by Northwestern Medicine and University of Colorado School of Medicine scientists.

This is the first time scientists have tested the effects of high-intensity exercise on patients with Parkinson’s disease, the second most common neurodegenerative disorder and the most common movement disorder . . .

Exercise May Improve Thinking Skills in People as Young as 20

Exercise May Improve Thinking Skills in People as Young as 20

Regular aerobic exercise such as walking, cycling or climbing stairs may improve thinking skills not only in older people but in young people as well, according to a study published in the . . . online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that the positive effect of exercise on thinking skills may increase as people age. The specific set of thinking skills that improved with exercise is called executive function.

Working Out May Combat Inflammation in Newly-Discovered Ways

Working Out May Combat Inflammation in Newly-Discovered Ways

Exercising muscles may block interferon gamma (IFN-γ), an inflammatory cytokine.

First-of-its-kind research performed on lab-grown muscle tissue suggests that when human muscle cells are stimulated during exercise, it triggers a complex chain reaction that may combat chronic inflammation by blocking a pro-inflammatory cytokine called interferon gamma (IFN-γ).

Low Fitness Linked to Higher Psoriasis Risk Later in Life

Low Fitness Linked to Higher Psoriasis Risk Later in Life

In a major register-based study, scientists at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have now demonstrated a connection between inferior physical fitness in young adults and elevated risk of the autoimmune disease psoriasis. For the male recruits to compulsory military training who were rated as the least fit, the risk of developing psoriasis later was 35 per cent higher than for the fittest.

*See Publisher’s Note

Publisher’s Note Regarding Medication Usage: This article mentions current medical treatments for psoriasis. The Health Examiner does not support drug usage to alleviate psoriasis symptoms but rather encourages readers to investigate alternative therapies, such as exercise, and other lifestyle approaches and natural supplements to address the root causes of psoriasis.

*This Publisher’s Note is not medical advice. Please consult with your physician regarding any health concerns. Acting on any information provided on this site is done so at your own risk.

Strength Training May Reduce the Risk of Diabetes in Obesity

Strength Training May Reduce the Risk of Diabetes in Obesity

Strength training over a short time period can reduce fat stores in the liver and improve blood glucose control in obese mice, according to a study published in the Journal of Endocrinology. The study reports that strength training over a short time-period, less than would be enough to change body fat composition in humans, was sufficient to reduce the accumulation of liver fat and improve regulation of blood glucose . . . 

Could Vigorous Physical Exercise Help People Live Longer?

Could Vigorous Physical Exercise Help People Live Longer?

A new study looks at the relationship between physical exercise and mortality.

A [recent] study . . . studied the relationship between moderate and vigorous physical exercise and mortality.

The questions the researchers sought to answer were: 

  • Is moderate physical exercise associated with decreased all-cause mortality?  
  • Is vigorous physical exercise associated with even less mortality? 
  • Does vigorous physical exercise decrease our risk of dying from heart attacks . . .
Running Actually Lowers Inflammation in Knee Joints

Running Actually Lowers Inflammation in Knee Joints

Running may also slow the process that leads to osteoarthritis

We all know that running causes a bit of inflammation and soreness, and that’s just the price you pay for cardiovascular health. You know; no pain, no gain. Well, maybe not. New research from exercise science professors finds that pro-inflammatory molecules actually go down in the knee joint after running.

Fight Cancer with Exercise

Fight Cancer with Exercise

If there’s one thing you need to know about cancer, it’s that most types of it do not have a strong genetic cause. . . .

To put it plainly: simple lifestyle changes can dramatically reduce your risk for cancer! . . .

Higher levels of physical activity have been found to reduce the risk of HALF the types of cancers reviewed in an analysis of data from more than a million Europeans and Americans.

The cancers that were most impacted by exercise included three of the most common cancers in the U.S. . . .

Why the Morning Is the Best Time to Workout

Why the Morning Is the Best Time to Workout

A morning workout is a staple part of my daily routine, and I recommend that all of my patients try their best to establish this healthy habit. . . .

Here’s why morning workouts are the absolute best:

They help you eat healthier throughout the day

Exercise is great for supporting healthy blood sugar balance, which means more energy, less “hangryness,” and fewer cravings for sweets. When you work out in the morning, it sets you up for healthier choices . . .

Higher Fitness Level Can Determine Longer Lifespan after Age 70

Higher Fitness Level Can Determine Longer Lifespan after Age 70

Researchers have uncovered one more reason to get off the couch and start exercising, especially if you’re approaching your golden years. Among people over age 70, physical fitness was found to be a much better predictor of survival than the number of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in a study being presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 68th Annual Scientific Session.

Is Less More When It Comes to Exercise? 8 Risks of Overtraining

Is Less More When It Comes to Exercise? 8 Risks of Overtraining

While regular exercise has a ton of proven benefits — lowering stress levels, giving you more energy, better managing your weight and improving heart health — this doesn’t mean that overtraining can’t cause the opposite types of effects. Despite what some people assume, due to the chronic stress it places on the body, the risks of overtraining are just as great as doing no exercise at all.

Study Shows How Exercise Stalls Cancer Growth through the Immune System

Study Shows How Exercise Stalls Cancer Growth through the Immune System

People with cancer who exercise generally have a better prognosis than inactive patients. Now, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found a likely explanation of why exercise helps slow down cancer growth in mice: Physical activity changes the metabolism of the immune system’s cytotoxic T cells and thereby improves their ability to attack cancer cells. The study is published . . .

Sport and Memory Go Hand in Hand

Sport and Memory Go Hand in Hand

If sport is good for the body, it also seems to be good for the brain. By evaluating memory performance following a sport session, neuroscientists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) demonstrate that an intensive physical exercise session as short as 15 minutes improves memory, including the acquisition of new motor skills. How? Through the action of endocannabinoids, molecules known to increase synaptic plasticity.

Aerobic Exercise and the Health of Your Microbiome

Aerobic Exercise and the Health of Your Microbiome

[Research has shown] that the higher your level of physical fitness, the greater the diversity of the bacteria in your gut. The meaning of this? That improved fitness correlates with a more healthy-looking bacterial array in the gut.

Now the more interesting question: if one was to begin a new exercise regimen, would s/he see a change, or improvement, in the diversity of bacteria in the gut.

Is Crossfit Good for Heart Health?

Is Crossfit Good for Heart Health?

For years, we have evidence that physical activity is associated with decreased morbidity and mortality from cardiometabolic disease.

Despite what most of us already know, only 20% of US adults meet current physical activity guidelines and 25% report no leisure-time physical activity.

[H]igh intensity interval training (HIIT) has gained popularity as a novel, time-efficient exercise strategy that has been shown to improve cardiometabolic disease risk factors . . .

4 Ways Poor Sleep Can Sabotage Fitness Goals

4 Ways Poor Sleep Can Sabotage Fitness Goals

If you work with people who are trying to lose weight, build lean muscle mass, or improve athletic performance, it’s critical to talk to them about getting adequate rest. Let’s look at just some of the many ways sleep can impact the ability to reach fitness goals.

  1. Sleep deprivation tanks testosterone levels.
    Anyone who is trying to build more muscle or get leaner needs healthy testosterone levels. Testosterone is an anabolic hormone . . .
10 Ways to Move Your Body More Thru the Pandemic

10 Ways to Move Your Body More Thru the Pandemic

No matter what long-term changes COVID-19 may bring about in this country, one thing is for sure: it’s imperative that you keep your body moving and stay fit throughout the pandemic and beyond. Not doing so comes at too high a price, namely, increased cancer risk, depression, reduced cognitive ability, prediabetic blood sugar levels (even if you’re at a healthy weight), poor sleep, and more. And the weaker your body is, the easier it may be for the virus to get a foothold inside it . . .

Nearly 60% of American Children Lack Healthy Cardiorespiratory Fitness

Nearly 60% of American Children Lack Healthy Cardiorespiratory Fitness

Nearly 60% of American children do not have healthy cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), a key measure of physical fitness and overall health, according to “Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Youth – An Important Marker of Health,” a new Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association . . .
. . . Children with low or unhealthy CRF [are] at higher risk for developing premature heart disease, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and high blood pressure . . .

Team Sport Lowers Blood Pressure in Postmenopausal Women

Team Sport Lowers Blood Pressure in Postmenopausal Women

Team sport effectively counteracts diminished vascular function in women with high blood pressure, even several years after the onset of menopause. This, according to new research from the Copenhagen Center for Team Sports and Health at Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen.

Study Links Increased Exercise with Lower Sleep Apnea Risk

Study Links Increased Exercise with Lower Sleep Apnea Risk

A study published . . . in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine found that increased physical activity is associated with a lower risk of obstructive sleep apnea, a common sleep-related breathing disorder. The study is the largest to date focused on the relationship between sleep apnea and levels of physical activity in the general community.

Researchers reviewed lifestyle, medical, socio-demographic and sleep health data collected from more than 155,000 adults . . .

Exercise Reduces Chronic Inflammation, Protects Heart, Study Says

Exercise Reduces Chronic Inflammation, Protects Heart, Study Says

Scientists at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have identified a previously unknown biological pathway that promotes chronic inflammation and may help explain why sedentary people have an increased risk for heart disease and strokes.

[S]cientists and colleagues at several other institutions found that regular exercise blocks this pathway. This discovery could aid the development of new therapies to prevent cardiovascular disease.

High-Intensity Physical Activity in Early Adolescence Could Lead to Stronger Bones in Adulthood

High-Intensity Physical Activity in Early Adolescence Could Lead to Stronger Bones in Adulthood

High intensity physical activity in early life might help maximize peak hip strength and prevent osteoporosis in later life, according to a study from University of Bristol researchers published in JAMA Network Open today.

The research, which analyzed data from 2,569 participants of the Children of the 90s health study, found that more time spent doing moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) from age 12 years was associated with stronger hips at age 25 years, whereas time spent in light intensity activity was less clearly associated with adult hip strength.

Experts Review Evidence Yoga Is Good for the Brain

Experts Review Evidence Yoga Is Good for the Brain

Scientists have known for decades that aerobic exercise strengthens the brain and contributes to the growth of new neurons, but few studies have examined how yoga affects the brain. A review of the science finds evidence that yoga enhances many of the same brain structures and functions that benefit from aerobic exercise.

5 Reasons Why Exercise Is So Important

5 Reasons Why Exercise Is So Important

People tend to think that “health experts” don’t get how real people live. But you know what? I do.

That’s because I’m a mom, I have a career, and I have a to-do list that’s a mile long. So one thing I know first-hand is that it’s tough to fit in a workout when life is hectic.

Here’s the thing: the benefits of exercise are so powerful that working out isn’t an option—it’s a must. And here’s good news: your exercise routine doesn’t need to take as long as you think.

Athletes Love This Circulation Booster

Athletes Love This Circulation Booster

One of the secrets of youth is a powerful molecule your body makes in the lining of your blood vessels.

It’s called nitric oxide (NO). . . .

Compared to other nitric oxide boosters, beetroot juice has an advantage: Beetroot juice is full of nitrates that go directly into your body’s bloodstream and muscle tissues.

One study showed that taking nitrate-filled beetroot juice before exercise contributed to less muscle fatigue . . .

Stretching Is Great for Your Heart

Stretching Is Great for Your Heart

Research proves that stretching is healthy.

Now it appears stretching is great for your heart.

A recent study found that leg stretching exercises were associated with improved vascular function.

Signs of vascular improvement were observed after study participants underwent 12 weeks of training in passive stretching (PS).

Not only was blood pressure reduced . . .

Are Family Workouts Key to Kids Forming Good Habits?

Are Family Workouts Key to Kids Forming Good Habits?

We’ve all heard it before; the obesity rates in the US are growing rapidly, but did you know just how bad it’s actually gotten? 1 out of 3 kids are now considered overweight or obese, which represents an increase of more than double in children and quadruple in adolescents in the past 30 years and almost matches the current statistic of how many American adults fall into the very same category, over one-third.

We’re in a crisis is an understatement.

Why Your Gut Bacteria Love Exercise!

Why Your Gut Bacteria Love Exercise!

By now, and if you read this publication regularly, you have digested considerable information regarding the gut microbiome and the integral part it pIays in our overall wellness and optimal immune function. In this video, Dr. David Perlmutter discusses the relationship between exercise and microbial diversity, a vital indicator of gut health, and the reasons why aerobic fitness helps create a robust microbiota.

Exercise Can Slow or Prevent Vision Loss, Study Finds

Exercise Can Slow or Prevent Vision Loss, Study Finds

The new study from the University of Virginia School of Medicine found that exercise reduced the harmful overgrowth of blood vessels in the eyes of lab mice by up to 45%. This tangle of blood vessels is a key contributor to macular degeneration and several other eye diseases.

The study represents the first experimental evidence showing that exercise can reduce the severity of macular degeneration, a leading cause of vision loss . . .

Reducing Risk for Diabetes with Exercise

Reducing Risk for Diabetes with Exercise

While there has been so much attention as of late focused on infectious diseases, there is another epidemic that may have even wider implications—type 2 diabetes. In and of itself, diabetes is a significant life-threatening condition. In addition, it is strongly associated with other important and potentially life-threatening diseases like Alzheimer’s, stroke, kidney disease, coronary artery disease, and even cancer.

According to CDC data from 2018, some 34.2 million Americans . . .

Yoga for Lymph Flow: A Gentle Practice to Support Your Immune System

Yoga for Lymph Flow: A Gentle Practice to Support Your Immune System

The lymphatics, as sort of the passive circulatory system of our immune system, is one of our most potent innate tools offering protection from the daily challenges our internal physiology meets. In addition to nutrition and sleep, yoga can be an effective and accessible tool to maintain a healthy lymphatic and immune system that doesn’t cost a lot of money or require any fancy products.

Exercise Offers 'Profound' Benefits for Friedreich's Ataxia, Research Suggests

Exercise Offers ‘Profound’ Benefits for Friedreich’s Ataxia, Research Suggests

A top exercise researcher at the University of Virginia School of Medicine is urging clinical trials of exercise in patients with Friedreich’s ataxia after finding that physical activity has a “profound” protective effect in mouse models of the debilitating genetic disease.

. . . [T]he new findings from UVA’s Zhen Yan, PhD, suggest that well-timed exercise programs early in life may slow the progression of the disease . . .

How to Optimize Your Workout Routine for Better Mental Health

How to Optimize Your Workout Routine for Better Mental Health

The link between exercise and mental health has long been established, and as research uncovers more about this relationship, we’re finding that there are certain ways workout habits can be adjusted to optimize our mental wellbeing. Here are five ways to make sure your mind gets the most out of your workouts.

Exercise May Protect Against Deadly Covid-19 Complication, Research Suggests

Exercise May Protect Against Deadly Covid-19 Complication, Research Suggests

Regular exercise may reduce the risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome, a major cause of death in patients with the COVID-19 virus, a top exercise researcher reports. He is urging people to exercise based on his findings, which also suggest a potential treatment approach.

A review by Zhen Yan of the University of Virginia School of Medicine showed that medical research findings “strongly support” . . .

Here’s the Link between Osteoarthritis and Exercise

Here’s the Link between Osteoarthritis and Exercise

If you have osteoarthritis (OA) and are struggling to find an effective solution to manage the pain and other symptoms it causes, you have options. It’s also possible to stave off the condition as you grow older.

You may be able to control and even prevent this debilitating disorder by going it on your own—that is, without pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. How? Good ol’ physical activity


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