Fitness


20 Ways Exercise Benefits Your Health (Part One)

20 Ways Exercise Benefits Your Health (Part One)

Exercise may not enable significant weight loss but it will otherwise profoundly benefit health according to countless studies. Hitting the gym will help to thwart and reverse diabetes, hypertension, dementia, and impaired lung capacity. Individuals losing bone density, characteristic of osteoporosis, can utilize physical activity to obviate this condition as well. Pounding the pavement also quells the systemic inflammation that facilitates chronic illness generally. And the list continues.

Exercise May Strongly Protect Against Poor COVID-19 Outcomes

Exercise May Strongly Protect Against Poor COVID-19 Outcomes

Kaiser Permanente Southern California conducted a study, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, revealing that consistent exercise may drastically lower the risk of COVID-19-associated hospitalization, intensive care unit admission, and death. Besides being older than 60 years of age and receiving an organ transplant, living a sedentary lifestyle is the third leading risk factor for COVID-19 mortality. Even cancer and heart disease comorbidities trail physical inactivity in producing poor COVID outcomes.

Leisure Physical Activity Is Linked with Health Benefits but Work Activity Is Not

Leisure Physical Activity Is Linked with Health Benefits but Work Activity Is Not

The first large study showing that leisure time physical activity and occupational physical activity have opposite, and independent, associations with cardiovascular disease risk and longevity is published . . . in European Heart Journal, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

“We adjusted for multiple factors in our analysis, indicating that the relationships were not explained by lifestyle, health conditions or socioeconomic status,” said study author . . .

Exercise Promotes Healthy Living and a Healthy Liver

Exercise Promotes Healthy Living and a Healthy Liver

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), also called hepatic steatosis or liver steatosis, is the most prevalent liver disorder globally and involves fat accumulating in the liver. NAFLD can ultimately lead to liver failure. Researchers at the University of Tsukuba discovered that moderate to vigorous intensity exercise alone, absent weight loss, helps prevent and reverse NAFLD.

High-Intensity Exercise May Restore Heart Function in People with Type 2 Diabetes

High-Intensity Exercise May Restore Heart Function in People with Type 2 Diabetes

University of Otago researchers have discovered that high-intensity exercise can reduce or reverse the loss in heart function caused by type 2 diabetes.

The study found that three months of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) improved heart function in adults with type 2 diabetes, without any change in medications or diet.

Self-Care Rx: Movement

Self-Care Rx: Movement

True health care starts with excellent self-care . . .

You may have heard how exercise helps your body stay healthy and fit, but do you know exactly how it impacts your skin as well? Maybe you have noticed that post-exercise glow or that people who exercise often have more youthful-looking skin.

Exercise offers a plethora of health benefits – it strengthens muscles and bones, improves sleep and mood, boosts the immune system, supports memory . . .

Higher Aerobic Fitness Levels Are Associated with Better Word Production Skills in Healthy Older Adults

Higher Aerobic Fitness Levels Are Associated with Better Word Production Skills in Healthy Older Adults

Healthy older people who exercise regularly are less inclined to struggle to find words to express themselves, research led by the University of Birmingham has discovered. . . .

The research, published . . . in Scientific Reports, is the first of its kind to investigate the relationship between aerobic fitness levels and temporary cognitive lapses, such as not having a word come to mind when speaking – known as a ‘tip-of-the-tongue’ state.

Low Fitness Linked to Higher Depression and Anxiety Risk

Low Fitness Linked to Higher Depression and Anxiety Risk

People with low aerobic and muscular fitness are nearly twice as likely to experience depression, finds a new study led by UCL researchers.

Low fitness levels also predicted a 60% greater chance of anxiety, over a seven-year follow-up, according to the findings published in BMC Medicine.

Lead author, PhD student Aaron Kandola (UCL Psychiatry) said: “Here we have provided further evidence of a relationship between physical and mental health, and that structured exercise . . . 

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Exercise May Strongly Protect Against Poor COVID-19 Outcomes

Exercise May Strongly Protect Against Poor COVID-19 Outcomes

Kaiser Permanente Southern California conducted a study, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, revealing that consistent exercise may drastically lower the risk of COVID-19-associated hospitalization, intensive care unit admission, and death. Besides being older than 60 years of age and receiving an organ transplant, living a sedentary lifestyle is the third leading risk factor for COVID-19 mortality. Even cancer and heart disease comorbidities trail physical inactivity in producing poor COVID outcomes.

Leisure Physical Activity Is Linked with Health Benefits but Work Activity Is Not

Leisure Physical Activity Is Linked with Health Benefits but Work Activity Is Not

The first large study showing that leisure time physical activity and occupational physical activity have opposite, and independent, associations with cardiovascular disease risk and longevity is published . . . in European Heart Journal, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

“We adjusted for multiple factors in our analysis, indicating that the relationships were not explained by lifestyle, health conditions or socioeconomic status,” said study author . . .

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20 Ways Exercise Benefits Your Health (Part One)

20 Ways Exercise Benefits Your Health (Part One)

Exercise may not enable significant weight loss but it will otherwise profoundly benefit health according to countless studies. Hitting the gym will help to thwart and reverse diabetes, hypertension, dementia, and impaired lung capacity. Individuals losing bone density, characteristic of osteoporosis, can utilize physical activity to obviate this condition as well. Pounding the pavement also quells the systemic inflammation that facilitates chronic illness generally. And the list continues.

Exercise Promotes Healthy Living and a Healthy Liver

Exercise Promotes Healthy Living and a Healthy Liver

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), also called hepatic steatosis or liver steatosis, is the most prevalent liver disorder globally and involves fat accumulating in the liver. NAFLD can ultimately lead to liver failure. Researchers at the University of Tsukuba discovered that moderate to vigorous intensity exercise alone, absent weight loss, helps prevent and reverse NAFLD.

High-Intensity Exercise May Restore Heart Function in People with Type 2 Diabetes

High-Intensity Exercise May Restore Heart Function in People with Type 2 Diabetes

University of Otago researchers have discovered that high-intensity exercise can reduce or reverse the loss in heart function caused by type 2 diabetes.

The study found that three months of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) improved heart function in adults with type 2 diabetes, without any change in medications or diet.

Self-Care Rx: Movement

Self-Care Rx: Movement

True health care starts with excellent self-care . . .

You may have heard how exercise helps your body stay healthy and fit, but do you know exactly how it impacts your skin as well? Maybe you have noticed that post-exercise glow or that people who exercise often have more youthful-looking skin.

Exercise offers a plethora of health benefits – it strengthens muscles and bones, improves sleep and mood, boosts the immune system, supports memory . . .

Higher Aerobic Fitness Levels Are Associated with Better Word Production Skills in Healthy Older Adults

Higher Aerobic Fitness Levels Are Associated with Better Word Production Skills in Healthy Older Adults

Healthy older people who exercise regularly are less inclined to struggle to find words to express themselves, research led by the University of Birmingham has discovered. . . .

The research, published . . . in Scientific Reports, is the first of its kind to investigate the relationship between aerobic fitness levels and temporary cognitive lapses, such as not having a word come to mind when speaking – known as a ‘tip-of-the-tongue’ state.

Low Fitness Linked to Higher Depression and Anxiety Risk

Low Fitness Linked to Higher Depression and Anxiety Risk

People with low aerobic and muscular fitness are nearly twice as likely to experience depression, finds a new study led by UCL researchers.

Low fitness levels also predicted a 60% greater chance of anxiety, over a seven-year follow-up, according to the findings published in BMC Medicine.

Lead author, PhD student Aaron Kandola (UCL Psychiatry) said: “Here we have provided further evidence of a relationship between physical and mental health, and that structured exercise . . . 

Exercise Can Slow or Prevent Vision Loss, Study Finds

Exercise Can Slow or Prevent Vision Loss, Study Finds

The new study from the University of Virginia School of Medicine found that exercise reduced the harmful overgrowth of blood vessels in the eyes of lab mice by up to 45%. This tangle of blood vessels is a key contributor to macular degeneration and several other eye diseases.

The study represents the first experimental evidence showing that exercise can reduce the severity of macular degeneration, a leading cause of vision loss . . .

Reducing Risk for Diabetes with Exercise

Reducing Risk for Diabetes with Exercise

While there has been so much attention as of late focused on infectious diseases, there is another epidemic that may have even wider implications—type 2 diabetes. In and of itself, diabetes is a significant life-threatening condition. In addition, it is strongly associated with other important and potentially life-threatening diseases like Alzheimer’s, stroke, kidney disease, coronary artery disease, and even cancer.

According to CDC data from 2018, some 34.2 million Americans . . .

Yoga for Lymph Flow: A Gentle Practice to Support Your Immune System

Yoga for Lymph Flow: A Gentle Practice to Support Your Immune System

The lymphatics, as sort of the passive circulatory system of our immune system, is one of our most potent innate tools offering protection from the daily challenges our internal physiology meets. In addition to nutrition and sleep, yoga can be an effective and accessible tool to maintain a healthy lymphatic and immune system that doesn’t cost a lot of money or require any fancy products.

Exercise Offers 'Profound' Benefits for Friedreich's Ataxia, Research Suggests

Exercise Offers ‘Profound’ Benefits for Friedreich’s Ataxia, Research Suggests

A top exercise researcher at the University of Virginia School of Medicine is urging clinical trials of exercise in patients with Friedreich’s ataxia after finding that physical activity has a “profound” protective effect in mouse models of the debilitating genetic disease.

. . . [T]he new findings from UVA’s Zhen Yan, PhD, suggest that well-timed exercise programs early in life may slow the progression of the disease . . .

How to Optimize Your Workout Routine for Better Mental Health

How to Optimize Your Workout Routine for Better Mental Health

The link between exercise and mental health has long been established, and as research uncovers more about this relationship, we’re finding that there are certain ways workout habits can be adjusted to optimize our mental wellbeing. Here are five ways to make sure your mind gets the most out of your workouts.

Exercise May Protect Against Deadly Covid-19 Complication, Research Suggests

Exercise May Protect Against Deadly Covid-19 Complication, Research Suggests

Regular exercise may reduce the risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome, a major cause of death in patients with the COVID-19 virus, a top exercise researcher reports. He is urging people to exercise based on his findings, which also suggest a potential treatment approach.

A review by Zhen Yan of the University of Virginia School of Medicine showed that medical research findings “strongly support” . . .

Here’s the Link between Osteoarthritis and Exercise

Here’s the Link between Osteoarthritis and Exercise

If you have osteoarthritis (OA) and are struggling to find an effective solution to manage the pain and other symptoms it causes, you have options. It’s also possible to stave off the condition as you grow older.

You may be able to control and even prevent this debilitating disorder by going it on your own—that is, without pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. How? Good ol’ physical activity

muscles

Women and Overtraining: When Exercise Destroys Your Health

We are bombarded with images of women with rock-hard-bodies. Whether it be in magazines, TV commercials, movie screens, or social media, there appears to be a cultural obsession with being as lean as possible. . . . But, what impact is this relatively new extreme fitness trend having on women’s health and longevity? Today we are exploring the ways in which overdoing it with fitness can actually be detrimental to the body as well as the mind.

Leyla Weighs In: The Exercise Rx

Leyla Weighs In: The Exercise Rx

The benefits of exercise cannot be overstated. It is an important component of a healthy lifestyle that includes diet, fresh air, pure water and sunshine.

To put it another way, exercise is a powerful medicine. This medicine makes your cells more sensitive to insulin, optimizing glucose metabolism. It oxygenates muscles and organs allowing for nutrient exchange via blood circulation and detoxification . . .

happy ladies jogging

6 Ways to Walk Your Way to Health

Walking. . . . [I]t’s an excellent, and often underrated, form of exercise that far too many people simply don’t do enough of.

Why is walking so important? Because the benefits of simply putting one foot in front of the other are extraordinary and increase with every step you take, reducing your risk of premature death and potentially adding a few years to your lifespan. So, put the car keys away . . .

Pushups

This Is How HIIT Workouts May Be Making You Constipated

When searching for the cause of your digestive issues, your exercise routine may not be the first place you look. [B]ut in reality, certain kinds of exercise can shock the body and its internal processes . . .

Depending on who you speak to, you may hear different answers about whether or not working out can make you constipated.

. . . But most experts agree that . . . this one type of workout can cause tummy troubles. That workout [is] . . . HIIT.

High-Intensity Exercise Improves Memory in Seniors

High-Intensity Exercise Improves Memory in Seniors

Researchers at McMaster University who examine the impact of exercise on the brain have found that high-intensity workouts improve memory in older adults.

The study, published in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, has widespread implications for treating dementia . . .

Researchers suggest that intensity is critical. Seniors who exercised using short, bursts of activity . . .

Guys running in snow

Here’s How Much You Need to Run to Cut Your Risk of Early Death by 27%

The life-lengthening benefits come at a lower mileage than you may think.

You know that running is good for your health—it can do everything from boost your mood to reduce your risk of issues like heart disease and stroke.

Now, new research published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine confirms pounding the pavement can help you live longer, too. . . .

They found that nearly any amount of running —logging less than . . .

The Biggest Mental and Physical Benefits of Working Out

The Biggest Mental and Physical Benefits of Working Out

Exercise does your mind and body good almost instantly, research shows. Here’s mega motivation to get stronger and healthier.

We’ve got some happy news that will rev up your exercise routine: The moment you head out on your run, launch into your spin class, or start your Pilates session, the benefits of working out kick in. “We see changes in the body within seconds,” says Michele Olson, Ph.D., senior clinical professor of exercise physiology . . .

Regular Exercise Cuts Odds for 7 Major Cancers

Regular Exercise Cuts Odds for 7 Major Cancers

Exercise may reduce the odds you’ll develop any of seven types of cancer — and a new study suggests the more you exercise, the lower your risk.

That’s the conclusion of researchers who pooled data from nine published studies that included more than 750,000 men and women.

“We found that the recommended amount of physical activity was in fact associated with significantly reduced risk for breast, colon . . .

How Exercise Reduces Anxiety and Makes You Feel More Connected

Here’s How Exercise Reduces Anxiety and Makes You Feel More Connected

We all know exercise makes your body healthier and helps you live longer. A growing body of research shows exercise is also linked to a wide range of mood-based and social benefits.

People who are physically active are happier and more satisfied with their lives. They have a stronger sense of purpose, feel more gratitude, are more connected to their communities, and are less likely to be lonely or anxious.

Good Physical Fitness in Middle Age Linked to Lower Chronic Lung Disease Risk

Good Physical Fitness in Middle Age Linked to Lower Chronic Lung Disease Risk

Physical activity that boosts fitness should be encouraged “to delay development, progression and death from COPD,” conclude the researchers.

COPD, short for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is an umbrella term for respiratory conditions that narrow the airways, such as bronchitis and emphysema.

Studies have suggested that a high level of physical activity and/or leisure time exercise . . .

Hikers

How to Exercise to Reduce Inflammation (And Avoid Creating More)

When it comes to reducing inflammation, we often turn to a healthy diet, hot baths, and nourishing massages. [E]xercise is also an effective way to lower inflammation. In fact, one study that followed 4,000 middle-aged people over a 10-year period found that those who exercise for two and a half hours per week lowered their inflammation by 12 percent.

But . . . which types of exercise are best? Here’s what the experts say.

Physical Activity May Protect Against Prostate Cancer

Physical Activity May Protect Against Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is the second most common type of cancer among males both in the United States and worldwide.

According to data from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), by the end of 2019, there will have been an estimated 174,650 new cases of prostate cancer in the U.S. alone.

[S]pecialists still have insufficient knowledge about the risk factors that may play a role in its development.

Skipping Breakfast before Your Workout Could Help You Burn Fat

Skipping Breakfast before Your Workout Could Help You Burn Fat

Exercising before breakfast can boost health benefits for people, including burning significantly more fat and helping them better control their blood sugar, according to a new study published this month in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism by health scientists at two British universities.

In the course of the 6-week study, researchers from the universities of Bath and Birmingham studied dozens . . .

Even Mild Exercise Helps the Brain

Even Mild Exercise Helps the Brain

An important part of my lectures over the past several years has been to emphasize how our lifestyle choices, around things like sleep, diet, and exercise, will ultimately impact the destiny of our brains. For example, we have long been discussing how exercising today relates to a healthy brain in the future, especially its association with reduced risk for dementia.

Now, new data is revealing that exercise . . .

Move Your Body – Love Your Brain

Move Your Body – Love Your Brain

How does simply moving around affect the brain? For the past several years I’ve been doing my best to get out the information that shows how aerobic exercise benefits the brain by increasing the growth of new brain cells, as well as reducing the risk for brain degeneration. However, it looks like most adults are not achieving the 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity/week recommended . . .

Here’s Why Exercise Is Crucial in Preventing, Treating Cancer

Here’s Why Exercise Is Crucial in Preventing, Treating Cancer

Kathryn Schmitz is seeking a paradigm shift.

Schmitz, a professor of public health specializing in cancer at Penn State University, thinks the perception of the ties between exercise and cancer is where the perception of the ties between exercise and heart health was decades ago.

Back then, she said, getting a patient out of bed and moving after a heart attack would be criticized.

Workout Routine

Exercise May Help People with Cardiovascular Disease the Most

New research comparing the benefits of exercise for healthy people versus people with cardiovascular disease found that the latter may benefit the most from being physically active.

Existing evidence shows that staying physically active can help a person live longer and that regular exercise can help prevent many chronic conditions, including cardiovascular disease.

Why You May Need to Exercise Less

Why You May Need to Exercise Less

Exercise is a major component of a healthy lifestyle, and the benefits of regular physical activity are well established. When adopting a Paleo lifestyle, modifying your fitness routine to include more high intensity exercise can bring great benefits to energy, body composition, and overall fitness.

However, there are many people who take their physique and physical fitness to an extreme level . . .

How Running Can Make Your Brain Work Better

How Running Can Make Your Brain Work Better

Training for endurance might just come with a pretty fantastic bonus.

You know exercising is smart. But might your workout actually be making you smarter?

In a study published in Nature, a group of over 1,100 people with an average age of about 28 participated in physical and mental tests. In the physical tests, participants walked as fast as they could for two minutes; their distance was measured . . .

You Can’t Exercise Your Way Out of a Bad Diet, but Here Are 7 Reasons Why Exercise Is Still Important

You Can’t Exercise Your Way Out of a Bad Diet, but Here Are 7 Reasons Why Exercise Is Still Important

“I am on board with changing my diet, but I don’t like exercising,” my reader says. “How important is it really?”

The short answer is: Very important, but not necessarily for the reasons you might suspect.

First of all, let me confess: I don’t like spending hours at the gym either. . . .

That’s unfortunate though . . .  Being sedentary is very dangerous for your health.

Exercise Alters Our Microbiome. Is That One Reason It’s So Good for Us?

Exercise Alters Our Microbiome. Is That One Reason It’s So Good for Us?

Exercise may change the composition and activity of the trillions of microbes in our guts in ways that could improve our health and metabolism over time, a new study finds.

The results provide novel insights into how exercise can affect even those portions of our bodies that seem uninvolved in workouts, perhaps providing another nudge to stick with . . .

Why Exercise Won't Make You Lose Weight

Why Exercise Won’t Make You Lose Weight

There’s no shortage of things people swore to leave behind in 2018: bad jobs, bad relationships, bad habits. But chances are, you’re beginning 2019 with something you didn’t intend: a few extra pounds.

Every January, one of the top New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight. And if you’re looking to be successful, there’s something you should know: Diet is far more important than exercise . . .

Why Exercise Is Good for Your Brain

Why Exercise Is Good for Your Brain

As JPM Healthcare week kicks off in San Francisco . . . experts weigh in on their predictions for the big trends in the coming year. One of the main topics: Will this be the year we finally see a successful drug for Alzheimer’s disease? 

But rather than play a guessing game, why don’t we look at what we know actually prevents dementia . . . exercise.


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